SPRING SYMPOSIUM A GREAT
SUCCESS

Carson Valley Inn – Gardnerville, Nevada

Symposium Chair Larry Schmidt orchestrated a great time for the attendees of the Spring Symposium. He had some help. Gerald Carbiener, Roger and Karen Gash, Steve and Patty Knight and Dave Hollecker pitched in and saw to it that the Convention and Board meetings, the Saturday program and evening dinner went off like clockwork.
Jack Greenhalgh entertained the members on Sunday morning with his knowledge and skill on making a wagon wheel at his shop and home near Reno.

Fremont

John C. Fremont

“Pathfinders Then and Now” was the theme of this year’s event. John Fremont was the subject of two topics: his route and campsites along the Carson River with Peter Lathrop and Stony Tennant telling the story, and his lost cannon’s probable location being described by John Wilusz.
Donna Cossette spoke on the Northern Paiute perspective regarding European pathfinders. Lee Dummel presented a “first person” reenactment of two men who rescued an emigrant Jayhawker party from Death Valley in 1849.
Dee Owens wrapped up the program with a power point presentation of discovering and mapping the Grizzly Flat Road.
A buffet lunch was followed by the award presentations and recognition program. Dinner was at the JT Basque Restaurant and Bar where members enjoyed a Basque dinner served family style. Both Carson Valley Inn and JT’s served exceptional food.

On Sunday morning attendees of the symposium were invited out to Jack Greenhalgh’s home and blacksmith shop near Reno. Jack gave a brief history on wagon and wagon wheel making, and the tools that make them. Jack has nearly all the original tools that were used to make these wagon parts, going back to the mid-1800s. The following paragraph and photos show the process for installing the iron tire on the wooden wheel.

blacksmith shop

This device takes flat iron stock and bends it into rounded iron – see upper right in photo.

blacksmith shop

The rounded iron ends are welded together and the entire iron tire is heated in a fire to expand it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

blacksmith shop

The hot iron tire is placed around the wooden wheel and fitted – note the smoke from the wooden wheel.

blacksmith shop

Once fitted, the iron is cooled with water, thereby shrinking the iron onto the wooden wheel.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

blacksmith shop

The wheel receives some minor adjusting and is ready to install on a wagon axle.

blacksmith shop

This wheel is ready for the iron tire. The device sitting on the spokes just in front of the axle hub measures the outside of the rim for marking the proper place to drill the holes for the spokes.

blacksmith shop

Jack talking about spokes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

blacksmith shop

No room for all his wagons? Hang ’em from the rafters.

blacksmith shop

Original Mica grease bucket.